NSW DEC Confucius Institute Organised 2013’ Chinese Language Teachers’ Conference in Sydney

[Source]    New South Wales Department of Education and Communities Confucius Institute [Time]    2013-08-19 14:38:49 
 

New South Wales Department of Education and Community Confucius Institute has held 2013’ Chinese Language Teachers’ Conference in Sydney on 2nd August, 2013. This year’s conference is titled “Teaching and learning Chinese Language and Culture in the 21st Century and beyond”. Ms. Junying Feng, Educational Consul from Consulate-General of China in Sydney, accepted the invitation to attend the conference and deliver a speech delightfully. Other participants included directors and staff of NSW DEC Confucius Institute, over 70 Chinese language teachers in New South Wales and 7 volunteer teachers sent by Hanban.

In her speech, Consul Feng welcomed the Chinese language teachers and thanked them for their effort to teach Chinese language and spread Chinese culture in New South Wales. She emphasized that we, Chinese language educators, were confronted with more challenges as well as opportunities, with the publishing of “Australia in the Asia Century White Paper “by Australian Government last year. Consul Feng also mentioned Chinese language teaching in primary and high schools in New South Wales would develop better and better, with the support from NSW DEC Confucius Institute.

As a newly-built Confucius Institute, NSW DEC Confucius Institute is quite new to even the local Chinese teachers. During the conference, Doctor Shuangyuan Shi, Director of NSW DEC Confucius Institute, briefed our institute to all participants. NSW DEC Confucius Institute is operated and managed by Jiangsu Provincial Department of Education and New South Wales Department of Education and Communities, the one and only Confucius Institute around the world run by Chinese and foreign government under the guidance and administration of Hanban. Professor Ning Zhang, director from Chinese side, made a comment and introduced volunteer teachers sent by Hanban to local Chinese language teachers.

In the second stage, Hilary Hughes, Languages Advisor from NSW Department of Education and Communities, introduced to the participants the situation of Chinese teaching and learning in New South Wales and in Australia. Jill Wilson, Project Manager from Education Services Australia Ltd., familiarized the teachers with an innovative website “Language Learning Space”, which could make Chinese teaching and learning more intriguing and interesting to the students.

There were also six workshops provided: “Stage 6 Chinese Extension Prescription 2014-2018 support materials”, “Multimedia redundancy effect in learning Chinese with Pinyin: a perspective from the Cognitive Load Theory “, “Using iPads in the Chinese classroom”, “Using Audacity effectively in teaching and learning of Chinese”, “Intercultural Chinese Language Learning: Chinese calligraphy and paper-cutting” and “Intercultural Chinese Language Learning: Chinese dance”.

Based on evaluation, most of the local Chinese language teachers were benefited greatly. The conference provided them a precious opportunity to communicate with peer teachers and discuss teaching methodology. The workshops would assist and inspire them in future teaching. Their cognitive and perceptual competences have been improved. Three of the workshops have been the most welcomed, namely “Using iPads in the Chinese classroom”, “Using Audacity effectively in teaching and learning of Chinese”, and “Intercultural Chinese Language Learning: Chinese calligraphy and paper-cutting”. It is because of the peculiarities of local education. Compared with students in China, Australian teenagers are more active, lively and more interested in hands-on activities; compared with in Chinese schools, electronic products are more involved in Australian classrooms, with various schools employ iPads in classroom teaching and learning. These characters require Chinese teaching should be tailored to meet the local needs, meaning teaching in accordance with students’ different aptitude and traits.

2013’ Chinese Language Teachers’ Conference in New South Wales was an unprecedented success. Especially, two volunteer teachers from China explained Intercultural Chinese Language Learning methods with first-hand materials, using Chinese calligraphy and paper-cutting. It was extremely novel to local Chinese language teachers. The local Chinese teachers and volunteers hoped that there would be more training programs like this in the future.

By Qianqian Zhang

 
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