Chinese Teaching Material Exhibition Kicks off in Chiang Rai

[Source]    Confucius Classroom at Lampang Kanlayanee School [Time]    2011-01-05 11:07:54 
 


Chiang Rai, Dec. 15th to 17th—the 60th Northern Thai Students Handicraft Competition & Art Exhibition opened and the Confucius Classroom at Lampang Kanlayanee School appeared at the event with Chinese teaching materials and multimedia teaching aids.

At the opening ceremony, student representatives took turns to make introductions in Thai, English, Chinese and French to the activity which was sponsored by the Thai Ministry of Education and boasts a long history of 60 years. Tracing the development of the northern Thailand, the main section featured a display of features of different changwats in northern Thailand. Sub-sections were set aside for different schools to showcase their own characteristics through gardening, woodworking, pottery, massage, food planting and weaving.



The Confucius Classroom added a special attraction to the event as it was the only Chinese language booth featuring abundant Chinese teaching materials and advanced teaching aids. Taking into account the wide range of visitors and to help the visitors become more interested in the materials, the Classroom staff laid out the exhibits according to their users, such as Kaikai Hanyu and Chinese Paradise for primary school students; Experiencing Chinese for both primary and secondary school students; Hanyu Jiaocheng, Contemporary Chinese and Chengo Chinese for college students. In addition to paper materials, multimedia teaching aids also attracted much attention. LCD touch screen equipped with Chinese cultural software and Great Wall Chinese software developed by Hanban conveyed the message that currently, Chinese education at the Classroom is not limited to paper materials, and that multimedia teaching aids are changing the traditional teaching model and making Chinese learning easier and more interesting.

During the 3-day exhibition, the Classroom booth received a large number of visitors, including policemen who were interested in learning Chinese by themselves, pupils fond of Beijing opera masks and pandas, high school principals in need of volunteer Chinese teachers, librarians wanting to know various dictionary editions as well as Chinese volunteers searching for teaching aids. They all put forward various questions and even the silk tablecloth on the booth once became the focus of consultation.

The Confucius Classroom has hosted 11 sessions since it launched the Chinese teaching material exhibition tour in 2010, covering Lampang, Lamphun, Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai and offering some aid for the local demand for Chinese teaching materials.